Media-Wize
Giving a voice to startups, founders and fast growth companies

With journalists receiving dozens of press releases and story pitches each day, the key that’s most likely to wear out on their keyboards is DEL.

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In his part manifesto-part autobiography titled On Writing, Stephen King said that not everyone can be a brilliant writer. But with effort, everyone could be a very good writer. The same goes with being a reliable performer in front of a camera or microphone. Being a great media spokesperson may come naturally to some, but anyone can do do a good job in an interview – with the right training and preparation.<!–more–>

Media-Wize CEO and co-founder Anthony Caruana recently penned a story for BandT on this topic.

You can read the fill article here.

Despite the massive amount of content that’s produced and published these days, the number of journalists is dwindling. That means fewer people are doing more work than ever. As a result, the it’s harder to get a journalist’s attention even if you have a great story to tell. Here are some tips to help you stand out in an ever-growing crowd.

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Doing your homework for interviews and preparing your facts are critically important for a media spokesperson.

This is why media training, conducted every two years is so critical as it will help you learn what facts you need to check, obtain, create and use to tell your story in the most compelling way.

There are many facts that you’ll need to be armed with and ready to use if required in a media interview, depending on the topic. These may be technical facts about your products or about turnover, growth plans, staff numbers, customer numbers etc. Some of these facts may be in constant flux, so you need to be aware of what you’ve said previously and what you’re saying now.

Google indexes news and makes it easy for anyone at anytime to Google your name, company name or product and read news reports going back years. If you said in 2017 that you had 10,000 customers in Australia, but the number is still 10,000 in 2019 reporting, then that’s easily noted.

It’s important that you know your most up-to-date stats at any time (check with your team regularly) and are consistently building on your message. If in fact, you only had 9,700 customers in 2017, but by the end of that year expected to have 10,000, then say you have 9,700 customers to the journalist – don’t round up numbers. Be accurate and build a truthful account of your business.

This is crucial for many reasons and for startups hoping to achieve coverage in major publications be aware you’ll be asked for your turnover. Why? Because your claims will be verified – if you say you’re the largest in Australia, but in fact haven’t made any money yet, then the reporter will wait till you’ve proven your idea is recognised by customers and investors.  If you do secure coverage, your turnover will be on the record so if you’re on track to become the next Atlassian, Canva or unicorn it will be touted.

Many media groups also run startup and fast growth awards so make sure you’re always operating with full disclosure. If you apply for these awards, the reporters will check your facts and if they find that they don’t match what you said in the past, you can be assured of not only failing to win but failing to be trusted again.

Reputation is crucial – it’s better to wait till you have a great story to tell, than jeopardise it.